Do It! Marketing Blog: Marketing for Smart People™

Thought Leadership Marketing Toolkit

Thought Leadership Marketing Toolkit

Welcome to our carefully chosen list of thought leadership marketing tools. We use these tools here at Do It! Marketing World HQ and highly recommend them to our clients and partners.

Good news: Many of these tools are free. A few are not. Almost all come with a risk-free "try before you buy" option to make sure you love them as much as we do. Please note that if you decide to make a purchase, I may (and probably will) receive a small commission. This commission is at no extra cost to you, and in fact, MOST of these links contain special discounts, free trials, or bonuses only available through these links.

With that said, please dig in and take full advantage of these hand-selected resources. They will help your business thrive, scale and grow -- just as they have helped ours!

Email Marketing: ConstantContact | Aweber | PopupDomination

Shopping Cart: KickstartCart Infusionsoft

Social Media: Tweetadder

Online Audio/E-learning: AudioAcrobat | JigsawBox | Ruzuku

Graphics: Pixabay | ReciteThis | PicMonkey | MyECoverMaker

Webinar/Screen Sharing: Screenr | StealthSeminar | AnyMeeting

Ecommerce: PayPal | Clickbank Infusionsoft

Landing Pages: LeadPages | Unbounce | LaunchRock

Website Builder: Strikingly

 

What would YOU add to this list? Use the comments section below and fire away!!

 

77 lessons for success in marketing, business, life

 

Tags: marketing for speakers, marketing speaker, consultant marketing, thought leadership marketing, marketing professional services, professional services marketing, trusted advisor marketing, marketing expert, email marketing, marketing for trainers, marketing professional services firms, marketing ideas, marketing strategist, marketing for authors, marketing for consultants, thought leadership, doit marketing, do it marketing

Corey Perlman eBootCamp Interview

corey perlman ebootcampHere's a two-part interview with my pal, Corey Perlman of eBootCamp.com. 

We talk about... 

  • Social media myths vs. reality
  • Why your website still matters - big time
  • Different social media approaches for different businesses
  • The key elements to a digital marketing gameplan that WORKS
  • A special time-sensitive offer to boost your marketing success

Part 1 is here... PLEASE STOP watching at 17:45 when our video connection blew up!

Due to hysterically funny technical difficulties, we put the last 5-6 minutes of content onto Part 2 here...

p.s. Corey is running one of his special 2-day intensive seminars in Michigan on 9/26-27 and you can get full details on that here. If you email him at corey@ebootcamp.com and put in the subject line, "David sent me" you'll qualify for a free electronic copy of Corey's bestselling book and "bring a friend" privileges to the event.

p.p.s. It's the best investment you'll make in your business this year. Corey guarantees it. And so do I. 

Tags: social media, marketing expert, small business marketing expert, small business coach, ebootcamp, corey perlman, professional speaker marketing, marketing ideas, small business marketing, small business marketing speaker, social media marketing, small business marketing coach

Marketing Coach: Build the Tribe Before the Tent

build the tribe before the tentBuild the Tribe Before the Tent

Have you ever wrestled with these problems?

  • I want more leads from my website
  • I need more subscribers to my newsletter
  • I can’t seem to generate any comments on my blog
  • I’m not getting any traction in my LinkedIn Group
  • It’s a huge struggle to fill my public workshops or events
  • I built an e-learning or video course but sales are disappointing
  • My Facebook business page is a ghost town
  • I wrote a great book and nobody’s buying it

I’ll stop there so you don’t get too depressed, OK?

We’ve all been there. And we all know that “Build it and they will come” is the last great false hope of the entrepreneurial class.

But in that statement also lies the answer.

Think about: “Build it and they will come”

Who’s “they”?

No, really - ask yourself this question.

Maybe even write down your answer on a piece of paper.

WHO. IS. “THEY”?

Most executives and entrepreneurs I work with who want to do a better job of marketing themselves and sell more products and services will come up with these answers:

THEY is:

  • My customers
  • My clients
  • My buyers
  • My prospects

OK, let’s take this one step further - who are your customers, clients, buyers, and prospects?

Here are some clues:

  1. They’re not strangers
  2. They’re not going to buy “sight unseen”
  3. They’re not going to buy on first contact

So what does THAT mean?

  1. They know you and your value proposition
  2. With them, you’ve built up visibility and credibility
  3. They buy (usually) based on a relationship, not on a single transactional impulse

Frankly, we all WISH buyers would buy ALL our products and services on a “transactional impulse” but that almost never happens, unless you’re running late night infomercials for knives - or insomnia cures. That one phone call - that one sales page on your website - that one email - that one postcard is almost NEVER going to make the sale.

Whatever product, service, or program you’re selling - the bottom line is simple:

You have to build the tribe before the tent.

Rather than this sequence:

  1. Invest time, money, effort, and energy (lots) to create a new product/ service/ program
  2. Offer it for sale
  3. Crickets. (Silence.) More crickets 

What if you created this sequence:

  1. Be as helpful as you can to as many people as you can as frequently as you can
  2. Build a loyal, fast-growing tribe of followers, fans, subscribers, and friends
  3. Offer value and invite engagement
  4. The next time you create something to sell, they’re lined up, credit card in hand, eager to buy the moment it’s released for sale

Who does this?

Rock stars. Artists. Gurus.

How?

They built the tribe before the tent.

  • Your website = your tent
  • Your keynote speeches and seminars = your tent
  • Your professional services offerings = your tent
  • Your newsletter = your tent
  • Your coaching and consulting programs = your tent
  • Your blog = your tent
  • Your LinkedIn Group = your tent
  • Your workshops, conferences or events = your tent
  • Your e-learning or video courses = your tent
  • Your Facebook business page = your tent
  • Your book = your tent

At the beginning, who and what are inside these tents? Obviously - it’s you. And a small fire. Just enough to keep you warm.

Now imagine yourself running around between these ELEVEN different tents, frantically tending those eleven fires, scrounging around finding enough wood to keep each fire alive.

  • How much room is there in each of these eleven small tents?
  • How available are you to welcome visitors into any one of those tents?
  • How much of a success (or failure) would you feel like if you occasionally got between 2-3 visitors in each tent to sit down and tell you their story or enjoy a toasted marshmallow with you?
  • How much time could you spend with THEM before running out to one of the nine or ten empty tents and leave them to entertain themselves?
  • How long do you think they'll stay in that empty tent without you to serve as host and with the fire slowly sputtering out in your absence?

Hmmmmm... interesting questions, right?

Now imagine things the other way...

You have a thriving tribe...

  • You offer them value
  • You invite their engagement
  • They start to follow you around
  • First 5 people - then 10 - then 25
  • And pretty soon 50, 100, 200 or more...

At some point, these folks will want to sit down - they’ll get hungry - they’ll get cold.

So you build something for them - a tent - and they welcome the opportunity to sit down with you around a blazing fire. They’ve each brought a log. One has a lighter. Another brings out some hot dogs. Someone else brought baked beans. Others start to break out the marshmallows, graham crackers and Hershey bars - S’mores for everyone!

There’s ONE tent. It’s not YOUR tent. It becomes OUR tent. You’re the leader. The provider. The sherpa. The guide. They gladly follow you for two reasons:

  1. The experience you provide when they follow you (value, resources, stories, ideas, guidance)
  2. The community you’ve built around them (the tribe, the relationships, the company of like-minded friends)

build tribe before tent hintThis is a much larger conversation -- and it’s tied to a very exciting project that we’re working on with some of the coolest small business experts on the planet. Can’t say any more than that for now. But stay tuned and you’re sure to hear more about it soon.

But the question YOU need to ask for the moment is…

How can YOU build the tribe before the tent?

Because sitting around in a small empty tent, exhausted, cold and alone… well, that just isn’t a lot of fun, is it?

What do YOU think? What are some examples of “building the tribe before the tent” that you’ve experienced? Are there some people YOU admire whose business fits into this model? Please use the COMMENTS area below to share your thoughts and experiences…  

build the tribe before the tent

Tags: marketing for speakers, thought leadership marketing, trusted advisor marketing, marketing expert, marketing for trainers, small business coach, marketing ideas, marketing consultant, small business marketing, marketing for authors, marketing for consultants, doit marketing, do it marketing, doitmarketing, small business marketing coach

I’ve quit and here’s why

i quitI’ve quit.

Yup - done, finished, over.

“Quit what?” you ask?

I’ve quit blogging.

OK, that’s not quite true...

But I’ve quit blogging daily.

It was an experiment.

And it worked.

And it didn’t.

Here’s the deal - for most of last year, this website averaged between 5,000-6,000 visits per month. Not great, but not terrible either.

At the beginning of this year, I committed to an experiment - namely blogging every weekday.

Yup, 5 posts a week. Week in and week out. I stuck to the schedule and didn’t miss a day in 26 weeks. 6 full months.

The result?

It worked great.

Almost immediately (OK, it took 8 weeks, but that’s close enough) my web traffic went from an average of 5,000-6,000 visits up to an average of 10,000-11,000 visits. One month, we even generated 15,000 visits - triple the old number. I'll explain that "we" later in this post...

My opt-in rate doubled (for everything - my free ebook, blog subscriptions, my free teleseminars.)

My SEO went up - I moved from page 2 and page 3 of Google results for certain keywords to page 1.

The second result?

I found out what really worked to drive more traffic, more leads, and more business.

And it wasn’t the blog...

It was three things:

1. My new book. Specifically, the marketing plan for my book, which turned out to also become the marketing plan for the website and the marketing plan for my speaking and mentoring programs. Woo hoo - who'd a thunk it?

Lesson: If you “lean in” and commit to the marketing for ONE flagship product, service, or program like I did with my book - you will start to generate momentum that carries over into everything else that you are doing.

2. Email marketing. Plain and simple, the more marketing emails I sent, the more web visits I got. Accident? No, of course not. Most of my emails contained links back to the website for the latest blog posts, the occasional teleseminar invitation or a new program announcement.

Lesson: The more email you send that contains high-value content, advice, insights, and recommendations (aka email that’s too good to delete), the more stickiness you’ll generate for your fans and followers. 

3. FLOP - Namely, “Featuring and Leveraging Other People.” I wrote about this concept in detail here and it has also been a tremendous driver of new traffic and new friendships, new clients, and new projects. Inbound FLOP is me shining the spotlight on others. And outbound FLOP is me participating in other people’s book launches, surveys, guest blogging, and so on.

Lesson: It’s not all about YOU. It IS all about how YOU can serve and promote other experts in your field who have a complementary skill set, message, or service offering. Welcome to the new collaborative economy. They win when you win. And you win when they win.

Sooooo... I’m still blogging.

But I’ve scaled down to once or twice a week.

And I’ve scaled UP the other activities listed above.

Because that’s what generates results.

What have YOU changed up in the last 3-6 months to STOP doing what doesn't matter and start DOING more of what matters most? Please use the COMMENTS area below to share your specific changes and how they've freed up more time or made you more money... 

13 signs to fire your web design firm, doitmarketing, david newman, marketing coach, marketing speaker


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Tags: marketing for speakers, marketing speaker, marketing strategy, marketing for coaches, marketing concept, thought leadership marketing, marketing book, marketing professional services, trusted advisor marketing, blogging for business, marketing expert, marketing coaching, marketing ideas, marketing coach, marketing consultant, marketing for authors, marketing for consultants, doit marketing, do it marketing, doitmarketing, business blogging

17 Reasons to Serve the Top of Your Market

41

What's the difference between a professional practice (or company or trade association) that feeds on the bottom vs. YOUR business model which should aim to serve the top of your market? 

Here are 17 things to consider:

  1. High fees are paid by clients and customers who are doing well, not those who are struggling

  2. Referrals come from those who are proud of the fees they pay you, not ashamed to be low-balling their way through business

  3. High-end clients tend to be believers - low-end clients tend to be skeptics

  4. Top clients are easier to please because they have a partner mindframe whereas low-end clients are almost impossible to please because they have a peddler mindframe

  5. Paying higher fees also means that your top-of-market clients pay you higher respect, pay your advice more attention, and invest more resources in their implementation of your ideas

  6. There is always a way to raise your game, boost your value prop, and charge higher fees. Otherwise, we wouldn’t have $500,000 sports cars or $35,000 watches

  7. There’s no profit in a business model that challenges other poverty-mindset entrepreneurs in a race to the bottom

  8. You can always design a “lower-level entry point” to a high-end offering (Example: the $125 Tiffany bracelet.) However, it is almost impossible to “level up” from commodity status. In other words, Wal-Mart would have a tough time attracting high-end jewelry buyers

  9. Are you attracting referrals to goofballs or people who don’t see the value of what you offer? Like attracts like. It’s very possible your current clients and customers simply don’t travel in the right circles  

  10. If you’ve heard yourself say, “My clients won’t pay any more than they’re already paying” or “I can’t raise my prices because I’ll price myself out of the market” - then you may need a. Better clients, b. A new market, or c. Both!

  11. High-end clients expect great work. It is energizing, engaging and fun for you and your team to rise to that challenge

  12. Low-end clients expect perfect work. Even though they have no idea what they want, change what they want based on whims, and are a moving target of conflicted priorities. It is demoralizing, exhausting, and depressing for you and your team to put up with these micro-managing, neurotic control freaks

  13. High-end clients value relationships and once they’re in with you, they’ll come back for more. Why? Because if they switch, they would essentially be admitting to themselves that they overpaid or made a wrong decision, which is more expensive to their ego than to their pocketbook. Bottom line: High-end clients always look for reasons to stay

  14. Low-end clients only care about transactions. The next coupon or email or offer will lure them away for the next bargain. They’re forever playing “Let’s Make a Deal” and the fact that they bought from you once REDUCES the chance they’ll buy from you again. Bottom line: Low-end clients always look for reasons to leave

  15. High-end clients will approach you with new ideas, ask for more innovative services, help you develop new products and programs that they WANT to buy and that people at their same level would value. They generate their own product- and idea-generating R&D department to help your business grow.

  16. Low-end clients will pressure you to give less, offer “lite” versions, and generally dumb-down and dilute your core offerings to match their small thinking and tiny budgets. Don’t fall for it.

  17. Companies that serve low-end clients are dependent on massive numbers of small transactions from one-time buyers and price shoppers. Companies that serve high-end clients thrive on small numbers of much larger, deeper, richer, and longer-lasting relationships with clients, customers, and friends who stay longer, buy more, come back more often, and refer like crazy.

So it’s your call - serve the top or serve the bottom.

Just be careful what you wish for and understand what you’re targeting -- and what you’re in for when you hit it!

What do YOU think? Please use the COMMENTS area below to share your advice, insights and recommendations on these ideas and join the conversation... 

13 signs to fire your web design firm, doitmarketing, david newman, marketing coach, marketing speaker

Tags: marketing for speakers, marketing speaker, marketing success, marketing concept, thought leadership marketing, professional services marketing, trusted advisor marketing, marketing expert, marketing coaching, marketing ideas, marketing coach, marketing strategist, marketing consultant, marketing for consultants, pricing

A Whole New Way to Market: Friend-of-Mine Awareness

youtility marketing bookGuest post by Jay Baer, author of Youtility

Today, companies must compete for attention against consumers’ friends and family members. Each day as people log on to Facebook, Twitter or Pinterest they see a variety of messages in their newsfeed or timeline, some of these messages are from their friends and family and some are from companies on social media. How can marketers compete in this environment successfully?

Friend of mine awareness and Youtility are the answer. Friend-of-mine awareness is predicated on the reality that companies are competing against real people for the attention of other real people. To succeed, your prospective customers must consider you a friend. And if, like their friends, you provide them real value, if you practice Youtility rather than simply offer a series of coupons and come-ons, they will reward your company with loyalty and advocacy, the same ways we reward our friends.

Youtility is marketing upside down. I call this Youtility, not “utility,” because a utility is a faceless commodity. Instead of marketing that’s needed by companies, Youtility is marketing that’s wanted by customers. Youtility is massively useful information, provided for free, that creates long term trust and kinship between your company and your customers.

As marketers, we’ve always tried to build loyalty with people, and now we must build loyalty with information. Social media marketing has changed the landscape of marketing by putting us in the mix with photos from our block party, our cousin’s baby and other companies trying to reach people as well. What you have is an intermingled mixture of information that matters to you because of personal relationships, and information that matters to you because of commercial relationships. It’s not just Facebook, either. Twitter works the same way, as do YouTube, Instagram, Pinterest, e-mail, blogs, and podcasts, too. For the first time, companies have to compete on the very same turf as our family and friends, using the very same tools and technologies and media and messaging as consumers.

My wife doesn’t buy radio ads to try and get my attention. My friends don’t buy newspaper ads to make sure I know what’s going on this weekend. But the opposite is most definitely true. Companies are now invading the spaces and mechanisms that we’re using to connect personally. The companies that will connect are the ones that are a Youtility in the social space, providing massively useful information that people want to see.

If your company and its marketing are truly, inherently useful, your customers and prospective customer will keep you close, as they keep their friends and family close. Making your company useful without expectation of an immediate return is in direct opposition to the long standing principles of successful marketing, and that’s a good thing.

Excerpted from Youtility: Why Smart Marketing is About Help not Hype by Jay Baer. See YoutilityBook.com for other resources.

jay baerJay Baer’s Bio: is a hype-free social media and content strategist & speaker, and author of the Amazon #1 bestseller, Youtility: Why Smart Marketing is About Help not Hype. Jay is the founder of http://convinceandconvert.com and host of the Social Pros podcast.

What do YOU think? Please use the COMMENTS area below to share your advice, insights and recommendations on these ideas and join the conversation... 

13 signs to fire your web design firm, doitmarketing, david newman, marketing coach, marketing speaker

Tags: marketing speaker, marketing strategy, marketing success, thought leadership marketing, social media, word of mouth marketing, marketing professional services, trusted advisor marketing, marketing expert, marketing professional services firms, marketing ideas, marketing strategist, social media marketing, becoming an expert

I Want to Pick Your Brain: 6 Ways to Answer Without Being a Jerk

doitmarketing i want to pick your brainGuest post by Mark S A Smith

When you’re an expert on a topic, people want to learn from you, and if they can, they want it for free.

They’ll say, “I want to pick your brain. Let me buy you lunch.”

Worst case, they’ll take you to a fast food restaurant and buy you a $5 meal and get thousands worth of advice.

Best case, they’ll take you to a great restaurant, spend $100 and get thousands worth of advice.

While it’s great to meet new people, here’s how can you say, “No, I won’t have lunch with you just so you can get an hour of free consulting” without sounding like a jerk.

1. Just Say, “No”

If you don’t want to discuss your expertise with them, reply with “Sure, but I have ‘no talking about work’ policy at lunch.”

2. Just Say, “Yes, but…”

Or say, “I’d love to have lunch with you. But, if you are looking for input on your project, I charge a consultation fee even if we’re dining. Otherwise, I never discuss work over food. What day works for you?”

3. I Will, If You First…

Get them to do something that shows commitment and shortcuts the process before you accept their invitation.

Say, “Sure! I’m happy to meet with you if you’ll first…” Have them send you an email describing their biggest challenge. Or have them fill out your assessment form. Or, if you’re a content creator, have them first take one of your mini courses.

Guess how many people call to follow up? Very few. Those that do are serious. Those that don’t, aren’t. Do this, and you don’t waste your time on those who aren’t committed.

4. Send Them to Your Website or Blog

Say, “I’ve got a really full schedule for the next month, so why not check out my blog (or website) that answers many of the questions that I get when people invite me to lunch. So, take a look, and send me a list of questions, and we can then schedule something next month.”

5. First, Buy My Book

If you’re an author, say, “I recommend that you first read my book. I specifically wrote it to answer the most common questions that I get. Whatever advice I have to give on [your topic], it’s in there. And it’s cheaper than lunch. So, jot down your questions as you read it, then call me and we can schedule lunch.”

6. Bring a $100 Bill

Say, “Brain picking isn’t free and I don’t eat cheap food. Bring a $100 bill and buy me lunch at a nice restaurant. If you’re not happy with the value of my advice, keep the hundred.”

One of my colleagues does this and he always keeps the hundred.

If they object, say, “I tell you what. I’ll give you three free pieces of advice right now that will make you more successful. Your first free success lesson: never do free consulting. Your second free lesson: free advice isn’t acted on like paid advice. Your third lesson: if you don’t get value in exchange, there is no real value generated.”

And I invite you to pick my brain with free instant access to the questions I get frequently asked when people invite me to lunch. Go to http://CompetitionProof.com now to learn great ideas to sell more, keep more margin, and keep your competitors out of you accounts.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mark_S_A_Smith

What do YOU think? Please use the COMMENTS area below to share your advice, insights and recommendations on this topic and join the conversation... 

13 signs to fire your web design firm, doitmarketing, david newman, marketing coach, marketing speaker

Tags: marketing for speakers, marketing speaker, thought leadership marketing, marketing professional services, trusted advisor marketing, marketing expert, marketing ideas, marketing strategist, marketing consultant, marketing for authors, marketing for consultants, doit marketing, do it marketing, doitmarketing

Marketing Coach: 7 Rules to DIP Your Sales Success

doitmarketing dip to success dollars in play

I asked one of my favorite marketing coaching clients, "How's your DIP?"

She responded, "Dip? We're talking party recipes now?"

"No, no - remember the acronym I shared with you last time? DIP stands for Dollars In Play." She remembered.

Then she asked me to hang on as she shuffled through some notes and papers.

"Where are you looking for these numbers?" And she said that she keeps a scratch pad by her keyboard and has a more detailed tracking document that she updates every couple of weeks on her computer. 

"Oh my goodness, there's your problem right there. You have to keep this info right in front of your face all day long." 

REALLY in front of your face. My suggestion - make a poster using something as simple as a piece of flipchart paper and two different size Post-It notes: the Jumbo size and the smaller 3x3 square size.  

Here's what a DIP (Dollars in Play) wall chart looks like: 

dip to success

Here's how it works:

1. Two categories: one called "In Play" and the other one for less serious prospects ("Jokers") You can see in the photo above, I've had a little fun and made a silly cartoon joker card. These are folks who are in my pipeline but (in my estimation) less serious, less committed, and less capable of making the financial commitment to hire me.

2. Post your prospects' full names, the service/product/program you discussed with them, the dollar value, and the source. For example, Jane Doe came from a referral from Frank. We have not talked yet, so there's no dollar value. Nat Cole came from Linkedin and we talked about a $1500 1-on-1 marketing consulting package.  Sam Smith is hiring me for a $6500 speech in October. (All prospect names have been changed for the purposes of this blog post and photo - could you tell?)

3. Real time updates. Sometimes I'll even grab my pad of 3x3 Post-Its and write someone's name down WHILE I'm on the phone with them, walk over to the wall chart and stick their name on it. Can't tell you how satisfying this physical act can be. 

4. Fluid movement. Don't be afraid to upgrade a joker to the serious column and don't be afraid to take a (formerly) serious prospect and move them into the Joker column. The factors to consider are their commitment level based on email and phone communication, their level of responsiveness, and how rapidly you are moving them from point to point in your sales process.   

5. Reminders rule. If you see someone on your chart whom you have not spoken with or heard from in a few weeks, you probably need to get back in touch. Ideally, you never have a prospect who is just "floating" out there without a firm decision call on their calendar. But it happens. The chart reminds you to close those loops and corral your prospecting mustangs back onto your sales ranch.  

6. Relentless removal. Remember the old sales adage, "Some will. Some won't. Who cares? Next!" That's the point of the chart. Up or out. If you're not going to buy, I'm going to cut you loose and throw you back in the ocean. The SECOND most fun you'll have with this chart (after slapping a brand new prospect's name onto the chart) is grabbing a prospect who said no - or who has disappeared on you despite your best efforts to hold them to their commitments - and RIP their name off the chart and tear it into tiny little pieces and chuck it in the trash.  

7. Do the math. Feel the power. The point of tracking your sales pipeline in this manner is so that you have a real-time sense of "Dollars in Play." Every so often, you should glance over at your chart and add up the numbers that you see in the "In Play" column ONLY. (Don't add the jokers because that's why they're in the joker column - instead, do everything you can to move your jokers into the "In play" column or remove them altogether!)

In the photo above, you would have a "Dollars in Play" number of $21,000. For prospects who are considering mutliple options (for example, Mindy Kaling is holding a proposal with a $7500 option and a $2500 option), you should count the higher number.

Two reasons: 1.) It sets your internal expectation in that direction which will enhance your confidence in your subsequent conversations with Mindy. A confident seller creates confident buyers. So it's a self-fulfilling prophecy. 2.) It builds your capacity for marketing optimism, which every entrepreneur needs. Plus if you're going to be relentless in removing people (See Rule #6 above), you might as well be relentlessly optimistic about the folks who earn and keep a place in your active sales pipeline.  

Now, are YOU ready for some DIP?

What do YOU think? Please use the COMMENTS area below to share your advice, insights and recommendations on this topic and join the conversation... 

13 signs to fire your web design firm, doitmarketing, david newman, marketing coach, marketing speaker

Tags: marketing for speakers, thought leadership marketing, trusted advisor marketing, sales rejection, sales prospecting, marketing coaching, small business coach, marketing ideas, marketing coach, motivational speaker marketing, small business marketing, marketing for consultants, doit marketing, do it marketing, doitmarketing, sales and marketing

Marketing Speaker: 6 Easy Ways to Win at PowerPoint

1. Sometimes, visuals can stand alone:

doitmarketing do it marketing 1

2. Use font sizes to help you make your point:

doitmarketing do it marketing 2
3. Use screen shots and visually focus your audience on key ideas:

doitmarketing do it marketing 3

4. Use arresting, unusual graphics, not the same old tired clip art:

doitmarketing do it marketing 4

5. It's OK to use graphs if you summarize the A-ha insight they provide:

doitmarketing do it marketing 5

6. Sometimes it helps to SHOW and TELL on the same slide:

doitmarketing do it marketing 6

What do YOU think? Please use the COMMENTS area below to share your advice, insights and recommendations on this topic and join the conversation... 

13 signs to fire your web design firm, doitmarketing, david newman, marketing coach, marketing speaker

Tags: marketing for speakers, marketing for coaches, thought leadership marketing, marketing expert, marketing for trainers, marketing coaching, marketing ideas, marketing coach, marketing for authors, marketing for consultants, doit marketing, do it marketing, doitmarketing, presentation skills expert, presentation design

Marketing Coach: 11 Questions to Spark Your Success

11 questions to spark your success

  1. There's no good time. Now is the time.
    What are you waiting for?
  2. Put out your best material. For free. 
    Do you want to be SHARED or SCARED? 
  3. YOU may be your biggest obstacle.
    What would happen if you got out of the way? 
  4. Stop STARTING things and get more into DOING.
    What can you do today - right now?
  5. A few may wish to see you fail. A lot more are rooting for your success.
    Where is your attention?
  6. Forget the word vision.
    Better: What do you SEE in your future?
  7. You're aiming too low.
    How can you elevate your sights, your fees, and your value?
  8. Stop blaming others. It's ALL your fault.
    Move on - what's next?
  9. A bend in the road is never the end - unless you fail to turn.
    Where do you need to turn? 
  10. It's not what you think it is. And it's bigger than you think it is.
    Why not embrace that? 
  11. There are no silver bullets, secret sauces, or magic beans.
    Now what's your plan? 

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